APPLY! REQUEST

The Master of Arts Program

THE GRADUATE FACULTY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

Dr. Larry Adams, Dr. Nancy Atkinson, Dr. Cynthia Burkhead (Chair), Dr. Vince Brewton, Mr. Daryl Brown,  Dr. Matthew Duques, Ms. Anita Garner,  Jr., Dr. Kelli Latchaw, , Dr. Nick Mauriello, Dr. Lisa Minor, Dr. Lesley Peterson, Dr. Cheryl Price, Dr. Brenna Wardell, Dr. Tammy Winner

Admission

In addition to the general requirements for admission to graduate studies, admission to the Master of Arts in English degree program also requires:

Unconditional Admission

1. Preparation: Applicants must hold a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution and have at least 24 semester hours in English above the 200 level. A Graduate Admission Committee will review each application; consequently, all applications and supporting documents must be submitted to the Office of Admissions of the University in accordance with submission deadlines established by that office.

2. Scholastic Achievement: A minimum of 2.75 GPA on a 4.0 scale in all previous undergraduate and graduate coursework.

3. Test Scores: Submission of satisfactory scores on either the GRADUATE RECORD EXAM (General Test) or the MILLER ANALOGIES TEST. Students who seek admission to the program must receive a minimum of 286 on the combined Verbal and Quantitative portions of the GRE or a minimum 388 on the MAT.

4. Letters of Recommendation: Three letters of recommendation to be sent to Graduate Admissions and Services, University of North Alabama.

Conditional Admission

1. Applicants who satisfy all requirements for unconditional admission except for the minimum scholastic (grade) requirement but who have an overall grade point average of 2.0 or better (4.0) may be admitted on conditional status subject to attainment of grades which include no more that three semester hours of C and no grades lower than C on the first three graduate courses (nine semester hours) for which enrolled.

Important Dates and Deadlines

Application for Candidacyimmediately after the completion of twelve hours, the student must complete and submit the Application for Candidacy form.

Master of Arts in English Program of Study Checksheet. The student must complete the checksheet at the same time at the Application for Candidacy.

Comprehensive Examinations will be given no later than one month prior to the beginning of final examinations. (Comprehensive Examinations are generally not given in the summer term.) Students must enroll in EN 696 Comprehensive Examination for the term in which the exam is to be taken.

Proposal for the Thesisthe thesis proposal must be submitted by midterm of the semester prior to enrolling in EN 690: Thesis. See the schedule of classes for the specific date for that semester.

Thesisthe final approved thesis must be submitted two weeks prior to the first day of final examinations. The thesis must be completed within two calendar years of enrollment in EN 690: Thesis.

Independent Study: Students must complete and submit an Independent Study Request Form during the semester before which they plan to enroll in Independent Study. Permission of the department chair required.

Application for Graduationconsult the current catalog and schedule of classes for university deadlines.

ADVISEMENT

Students should meet regularly with their assigned advisor. When the Application for Admission for Candidacy is complete and submitted, the Director of Graduate Studies will assign the student a major academic advisor.

DEGREE AND PROGRAM PLANS

Master of Arts in English Degree a minimum of 36 semester hours of credit, to include the following core and options:

Core Courses of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

EN 601 Introduction to Graduate Studies: Bibliography and Research (3)

EN 655 Literary Criticism (3)

Students should take the core courses as early as possible in their program, but must complete them by the time they have taken 18 hours of coursework.

Literature Requirement.........................18

Students must take a minimum of 18 semester hours of literature courses, not including the core classes. At least 15 of those hours must be in the student's area of concentration, e.g. British or American literature.

Elective Courses of Study.......................12

THESIS OPTION: Students choosing the Thesis Option must complete EN 690 Thesis (6) in addition to the core and 24 additional semester hours
from among courses of instruction listed below.

Thesis Proposal: Students choosing this option must submit a thesis proposal no later than mid-term of the semester prior to enrolling in EN 690 Thesis.

Thesis Defense: Students choosing the Thesis Option must enroll in EN 695 Thesis Defense during the term in which they complete the thesis.

NON-THESIS OPTION: Students choosing the Non-Thesis Option must complete 30 hours from among courses of instruction listed below
in addition to the core, excluding EN 690.

Comprehensive Examination: Students choosing Non-Thesis Option must enroll in EN 696 Comprehensive Examination, at the appropriate time
and must successfully complete a comprehensive examination.

At least 50% of the coursework required to complete the selected option must be earned at the 600 level.

NON-THESIS AND THESIS OPTIONS

Non-Thesis Option

Directed Readings (EN 699): This course of study is not required but may be taken as
an elective in preparation for the Comprehensive Examination. Not available to student choosing the Thesis Option.
Prerequisites: 1. Completion of at least 27 hours at the graduate level in English. 2. Department approval

1. Directed Readings must be taken at least one semester prior to taking the
Comprehensive Exam. The Comprehensive Exam cannot be taken during the same semester as Directed Readings.

2. Directed Readings will not be offered during the summer term.

3. Students must choose one of four time periods: American Literature to 1865; American Literature, 1865 to the present;
British Literature to the Restoration; British Literature, the Restoration to the present.

4. The reading list should cover twenty to twenty-five works with no more than half of those works in a particular concentration.

5. A student cannot concentrate on a particular genre or author.

6. Suggested evaluation: The student will be required to write a minimum of twenty detailed analytical summaries
of the materials read and, at the end of the course of study, submit an 8-10 page paper providing an overview
of the reading. Other means of evaluation may be decided upon through consultation with the instructor.

Comprehensive Examinations

The Comprehensive Examinations will be scheduled no later than one month prior to the beginning of final examinations. Students should check with the departmental secretary for the specific date and time for the examination. (Comprehensive Exams are not given during the summer term.)

Thesis Option

Thesis Requirements

1. A thesis proposal must be submitted and approved prior to enrolling in EN 690 Thesis.

2. The thesis must be completed and submitted at least two weeks prior to the beginning of final examinations. Students should check with the departmental
secretary for the specific date.

3. The thesis committee will consist of the director and a second reader selected by the thesis director in consultation with the student.

4. Two bound copies of the approved thesis will be required, one for Collier Library and one for the department.

5. The final approved thesis must be submitted two weeks prior to the first day of final examinations.

6. The student must enroll in EN 695 Thesis Defense during the term in which the thesis is completed.

THESIS GUIDELINES

1. A thesis should reflect original, substantive research in the student's area of interest. Since a thesis will reflect the professional interests of the student, it may vary in the approach it takes, but it should be a minimum of sixty pages.

2. A thesis counts for six graduate credits.

3. The student's advisor will supervise the thesis; and in consultation with the student, will select the Second Reader for the thesis.

4. The proposal (2-3 pages, typewritten, double-spaced) must be approved by the advisor and the second reader. It should contain the following:

  • a review of literature relative to the proposed thesis topic,
  • a description of projected work, to include a chapter-by-chapter layout
  • a statement of purpose focusing the student's idea and explaining what he / she expects to accomplish,

5. After the proposal is approved, the student should establish a schedule of meetings with the advisor.

6. Two copies of the approved thesis must be submitted to the Chair, Department of English, 113 Willingham Hall.

FORMAT

All pages 8 1/2 X 11 inches, archival paper

Type used must be consistent, Times New Roman 12 pitch

Double-spaced throughout the entire document

One and one-half inch left margin, one inch for all other margins. All text, including page numbers, must fit within margins.

Abstract, no longer than 600 words, containing a chapter by chapter summary of the thesis.

Table of Contents, including a comprehensive listing of chapter headings and sub-headings.

Body of thesis

Citations, references, and grammar in accordance with guidelines in the MLA Handbook (current edition).

Cover page; ( Sample title page)

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

EN 501. Chaucer. 3 semester hours.

The major and minor works of Chaucer, including The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Creseyde. (Fall, even-numbered years)

EN 502. Milton. 3 semester hours.

Although some prose works are studied, the emphasis is on John Milton as a poet, with special attention to Paradise Lost. (Fall, 0dd-numbered years)

EN 505. African-American Literature. 3 semester hours.

An investigation of the development of African-American literature from the earliest works to the present. Critical examination of selected writers of poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

EN 541. History of the English Language. 3 semester hours.

Development of the English language and of modern English usage. (Fall; Summer, odd-numbered years)

EN 542. Survey of Grammar. 3 semester hours.

A survey of approaches to English grammar based on approaches now used in most school texts. Prerequisite: EN 441
or written permission of department chair. (Spring, odd-numbered years; Summer, even-numbered years)

EN 543. Instruction of Composition. 3 semester hours.

Approaches to and practice in the instruction of English composition. (Fall, odd-numbered years; Spring)

EN 550. Studies in American Folklore. 3 semester hours.

Sources, backgrounds, and morphology of American folklore. Emphasis is given to research methods and to fieldwork. (Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 551. The American Novel. 3 semester hours

From the beginning of the American novel to the twentieth century. (Spring, even numbered years)

EN 552. The American Novel. 3 semester hours

Intensive study of the works of selected American authors. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 553. The English Novel. 3 semester hours.

Representative works in the development of the English novel.(Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 554. The English Novel. 3 semester hours

Intense study of selected English authors.(Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 556. Advanced Creative Writing. 3 semester hours

A practical approach to literary techniques and writing for publication with special emphasis on structure, theme, and characterization. Class discussion with be supplemented by conferences with the instructor. Prerequisite: EN 455. (Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 560. Literature of the American Frontier 3 semester hours

An examination of the literature of the American frontier, beginning with authors such as James Fenimore Cooper and moving forward to modern writers such as Cormac McCarthy. Emphasis is on the changing perspective of the frontier as it progressed from the East coast to the West.

EN 565. Contemporary Poetry. 3 semester hours.

Extensive reading in the works of the contemporary British and American poets, with emphasis on their relation to the literary traditions of the past and their innovations and experiments in matter and form. (Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 572W. Rhetoric: Argument and Style. 3 semester hours.

Examination of the ideas in writing and speech from classical Greek origins to modern times, with a focus on composition and on analysis of essays and speeches. Also listed as COM 572W, but creditable only in the field for which registered. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

EN 594. Selected Topics in Film Studies. 3 semester hours.

A study of a selected period or subject in film. Topics might include censorship in cinema; women in film; avant-garde cinema; national cinemas; film movements, spirituality in film; race and cinema; film rhetoric; or adaptation. (Spring, odd-numbered years or on sufficient demand)

EN 595. Selected Topics in Writing. 3 semester hours.

Concentrated study in specific areas of written composition. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 596. Selected Topics in English Literature. 3 semester hours.

Concentrated study in specific narrow areas of English literature. (Spring, odd-numbered years, if sufficient demand)

EN 597. Selected Topics in American Literature. 3 semester hours.

Concentrated study in narrow areas of American literature. (Fall, even-numbered years, if sufficient demand)

EN 598. Selected Topics in Literature. 3 semester hours.

Concentrated study in specific narrow areas of world literature. (Spring, even-numbered years, if sufficient demand)

EN 601. Introduction to Graduate Studies: Bibliography and Research. 3 semester hours.

Emphasis on contemporary methods and aims of literary research; special readings designed to familiarize students with a wide range of available source materials and research techniques. Required of students seeking a Master's degree in English. (Fall)

EN 611. Studies in American Literature to 1855. 3 semester hours.

Selected major authors in American literature, including Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Poe, Hawthorne, and Melville.

EN 612. Studies in American Literature 1855 to 1910. 3 semester hours.

Selected major authors in American literature between 1855 and the advent of World War I, including such writers as Twain, Crane, Norris, Wharton, and DuBois.

EN 613. Studies in American Literature 1910 to 1950. 3 semester hours.

Selected major authors in American literature from World War I to the beginning of the Post-World-War II era, including such writers as Faulkner, Hemingway, Eliot, and Wright.

EN 614. Studies in American Literature 1950 to present. 3 semester hours.

Selected major authors in American literature from 1950 through the contemporary period.

EN 620. English Literature Before 1500. 3 semester hours.

The political, social, and intellectual aspects of the Medieval period as reflected in the major literary works.

EN 621. English Literature: Renaissance to Restoration. 3 semester hours.

The political, social, and intellectual aspects of seventeenth-century England as reflected in the major literary works.

EN 622. Early Modern Drama Excluding Shakespeare. 3 semester hours.

Selected major authors in Early Modern drama, excluding Shakespeare, form 1540-1800.

EN 623. Shakespeare. 3 semester hours.

Intense study of selected poetry and plays of William Shakespeare approached from a variety
of perspectives, including but not limited to historical, theoretical, critical, or generic

EN 630. Jane Austen and the Romantic Novel. 3 semester hours.

Study of the novels of Jane Austen and her contemporaries.

EN 631. English Literature: Restoration and Eighteenth Century. 3 semester hours.

The political, social, and intellectual aspects of England from the Restoration to the publication of Lyrical Ballads, as reflected in the major literary works.

EN 632. Romantic Poetry and Prose. 3 semester hours.

An overview of Romanticism in English with readings from the expanding Romantic canon and an introduction to recent scholarship and disputes.

EN 633. Modern and Contemporary English Literature. 3 semester hours.

Intensive study of major English writers since World War I.

EN 634. Victorian Poetry and Prose. 3 semester hours

Examination of Victorian novels, essays, and poems.

EN 641. English Linguistics. 3 semester hours.

Analysis of contemporary American English: syntax, phonology, morphology. Traditional, structural, and transformational approaches.

EN 642. Cross-Linguistic Pragmatics. 3 semester hours.

A study in the analysis of similarities and differences in linguistic forms and patterns across diverse cultures.

EN 653. Studies in the Novel. 3 semester hours.

The novel as a literary genre approached from a variety of perspectives, including but not limited to generic, historical, theoretical, and single-author approaches. Course content varies.

EN 655. Literary Criticism. 3 semester hours.

Major critical trends in literary theory, with emphasis on criticism since 1945, including structuralist, cultural materialist, deconstructive, and feminist approaches to literature. Exploration of these theories and analysis of selected works of literature. Required of students seeking a Master's degree in English. (Spring)

EN 690. Thesis. 6 semester hours.

Selection of a research problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of data, and composition of a defensible thesis. Prerequisite: permission of the Director of Graduate Studies. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 695.Thesis Defense. 0 Credit Hours

Orientation to and administration of a thesis defense for the MA in English program. A non-credit course required of all candidates for the thesis option. The course is to be taken in the last term in which the student is expected to complete all other program requirements. A grade of 'S' indicating satisfactory performance or a grade of 'U' for unsatisfactory performance will be recorded on the transcript. A grade of 'S' is required for graduation; the course may be repeated once. Prerequisite: student must have completed all other program requirements or be enrolled in the last course for program completion.

EN 696. Comprehensive Examination. 0 semester hours

Orientation to and administration of a written comprehensive examination for the M. A. in English program. A non-credit course required of all candidates for the Non-Thesis option. The course is to be taken the term in which the student expects to complete all other program requirements, or the term immediately thereafter. A grade of "S" indicating satisfactory performance or a grade of "U" for unsatisfactory will be recorded on the transcript. A grade of "S" is required for graduation; the course may be repeated once. Prerequisite: student must have completed all other program requirements or be enrolled in the last course(s) for program completion. (Offered: Fall, Spring).

EN 697. Independent Study. 3 semester hours

Independent study or research under departmental determination, supervision, and evaluation. A student may take no more that two independent study courses. Prerequisite: permission of chair of the department. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 698. Selected Topics in Literature. 3 semester hours.

Study in a specific author, genre, or time period. Focus may be English literature, American literature, literature of the western world, or other areas of world literature.

EN 699. Directed Readings and Research. 3 semester hours.

Individually supervised reading and research in a literary period, genre, or author. Prerequisite: permission of the Director of Graduate Studies.(Fall, Spring)

READING LISTS FOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMS

The reading lists provided are not exhaustive or absolute. Rather, they are designed as the basis for assigning readings and may be amended to fit the particular needs of the individual student. Students should consult closely with their advisor to determine the specific reading assignments and means of assessing the readings.

Areas of Concentration

American Literature to 1865

William Bradford

Of Plymouth Plantation

Jonathan Winthrop

The History of New England

Anne Bradstreet

Selected poetry

Mary Rowlandson

A Narrative of the Captivity andRestoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson

Edward Taylor

Preparatory Meditations

Jonathan Edwards

Sinner in the Hands of an Angry God

Benjamin Franklin

The Autobiography

Thomas Jefferson

The Declaration of Independence

Notes on the State of Virginia

Thomas Paine

Common Sense

The Age of Reason

St. Jean de Crevecoeur

Letters from an America Farmer

Philip Freneau

"House of Night"

Selected poetry

Phillis Wheatley

Selected poetry

Susanna Rowson

Charlotte Temple

Charles Brockden Brown

Weiland

Edgar Huntly

Washington Irving

The Sketch Book

A Tour on the Prairies

James Fenimore Cooper

The Deerslayer

The Prairie

The Pioneers

The Last of the Mohicans

William Cullen Bryant

Selected poetry

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Selected essays

Margaret Fuller

The Great Lawsuit

Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Scarlet Letter

The House of Seven Gables

Selected short fiction

Edgar Allan Poe

Selected short stories

Selected poetry

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Selected poetry

Henry David Thoreau

Walden

Resistance to Civil Government

Harriett Beecher Stowe

Uncle Tom's Cabin

Harriett Jacobs

Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

Frederick Douglass

Narrative of the Life of Frederick

Douglass

Walt Whitman

Leaves of Grass

Herman Melville

Moby-Dick

"Bartleby, The Scrivener"

Rebecca Harding David

Live in the Iron Mills

Emily Dickinson

Selected poetry

American Literature 1865 to Present

William Dean Howells

The Rise of Silas Lapham

A Traveler from Altruria

Criticism and Fiction

Mark Twain

Huckleberry Finn*

Roughing It

The Celebrated Jumping Frog

of Calaveras County

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

Puddn head Wilson

Henry James

A Turn of the Screw

The Real Thing and Other Tales

The Portrait of a Lady

"The Art of Fiction"*

"Daisy Miller"

Regionalists / Local Color Writers

(Selected pieces from the following)

George Washing Cable

Bret Hart

Sarah Orne Jewett

Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

Kate Chopin

The Awakening*

Joel Chandler Harris

Hamlin Garland

Main-Travelled Roads

Boy Life on the Prairie

Crumbling Idols

Henry Adams

The Education of Henry Adams

W.E.B Dubois

The Souls of Black Folks

Frank Norris

McTeague

The Octopus

Vandover and the Brute

"A Plea for Romantic Fiction"*

Stephen Crane

Maggie: A Girl of the Streets

The Red Badge of Courage*

War Is Kind (poetry)

Selected short stories

Jack London

The Call of the Wild

The Sea-Wolf

Willa Cather

My Antonia

O Pioneers!

The Song of the Lark

Eugene O'neill

The Hairy Ape

Desire Under the Elms*

The Iceman Cometh

Long Day's Journey into Night*

Jean Toomer

Cane

F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby

Tender Is the Night

William Faulkner

The Sound and the Fury

Intruder in the Dust

The Unvanquished

The Hamlet

Ernest Hemingway

The Sun Also Rises

In Our Time

Old Man and the Sea

A Farewell to Arms

For Whom the Bell Tolls

Hemingway Collected Stories

John Steinbeck

The Grapes of Wrath*

To a God Unknown

Of Mice and Men

The Long Valley*

Richard Wright

Native Son

Uncle Tom's Children

Eudora Welty

The Optimist's Daughter

Selected short fiction

Tennessee Williams

The Glass Menagerie

A Streetcar Named Desire

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Ralph Ellison

Invisible Man

Arthur Miller

Death of a Salesman

Katherine Anne Porter

Collected Stories

Flannery O'Connor

Wise Blood

A Good Man Is Hard to Find

The Violent Bear It Away

Toni Morrison

Song of Solomon

Tar Baby

Beloved

Alice Walker

The Color Purple

Zora Neale Hurston

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Poetry

(Be familiar with a wide variety of poems for the following authors)

Robert Frost

Wallace Stevens

William Carlos Williams

Marianne Moore

Langston Hughes

E. E. Cummings

Randall Jarrell

Gwendolyn Brooks

Allen Ginsberg

Adrienne rich

Sylvia Plath

Joy Harjo

Rita Dove

T.S. Eliot

British Literature

From the beginning to the Restoration

Anglo-Saxon Period:

Bede

The Ecclesiastical History of the
English People

The Dream of the Rood

Beowulf

The Battle of Maldon

Late Medieval Period:

Geoffrey of Monmouth

History of the Kings of Britain

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Malory

The Morte Darthur

Selections from English Mystery Plays (York, N-town, and Chester cycles)

Robin Hood and Other Outlaw Tales

Margery Kempe

The Book of Margery Kempe

Julian of Norwich

Selections from Showings

Chaucer

The Canterbury Tales

Vision of Piers Plowman (B)

Shakespeare

Selected plays and sonnets (those not
covered in the Shakespeare course)

Marlowe

Doctor Faustus

Edward II

Jonson

Volpone

The Alchemist

Bartholomew Fair

The Poems of Mary Wroth

Sidney

The Defense of Poesie

Astrophil and Stella

Arcadia

Milton

Paradise Lost

Samson Agonistes

Comus

Aeropagitica

The Reason of Church Government
Urged Against Prelaty

Behn

Oroonoko

The Rover, and selected poems

Cavendish

The Blazing World and Other
Writings

Spenser

The Faerie Queene (select books)

Secondary Sources:

Stallybrass and White The Politics and Poetics of Transgression,

Greenblatt Shakespearean negotiations

Kastan and Stallybrass

Staging the Renaissance

Ferguson, Quilligan and Vickers

Rewriting the Renaissance

Wilcox Women and Literature in Britain: 1500-1700

Lee Patterson Negotiating the Past: The Historical Understanding of Medieval Literature

Stephen Knight Arthurian Literature and Society

Gabrielle Spiegel The Past as Text: The Theory and Practice of Medieval Historiography

Paul Strohm Social Chaucer

David Aers and Lynn Staley The Powers of the Holy: Religion, Politics, and Gender in Late Medieval English Culture

British Literature

From Restoration to Present

Wycherley

The Country Wife

Wollstonecraft

A Vindication of the Rights of
Woman (Norton Critical Edition)

Behn

Oroonoko and The Rover

Rochester

Complete Poems of John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester

Montagu

Turkish Embassy Letters

Richardson

Pamela

Fielding

Tom Jones

Pope

The Rape of the Lock

(Bedford Cultural Edition)

An Essay on Man

Swift

The Writings of Jonathan Swift

Selected poems

Gulliver's Travels

Congreve

The Way of the World

Addison and Steele Selections

from The Spectator and The Tatler

Samuel Johnson

selected works

Goldsmith

poems

Burney

Evelina.

Gray

poems

Collins

poems

Defoe

Moll Flanders

Sterne

Tristram Shandy

Nineteenth Century

Blake

Songs of Innocence and Experience

The Book of Thel

The Marriage of Heaven and Hell

The Four Zoas and Jerusalem

Browning

The Ring and the Book and representative poems

Byron

Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
Manfred

Don Juan, and representative poems

Coleridge

Conversation poems

selections from Biographia Literaria

TheRime of the Ancient Mariner, Christabel and representative poems

Keats

The six major odes, four narrative poems and selections from the letters

Shelley

Prometheus Unbound

A Defense of Poetry

and representative poems

Tennyson

In Memoriam and representative poems

Wordsworth

The Prelude and representative poems

Austen

Emma

Bronte

Wuthering Heights

Bronte

Jane Eyre

Dickens

David Copperfield


Eliot

Middlemarch

Hardy

Jude the Obscure

Scott

Ivanhoe

Shelley

Frankenstein

Arnold, Carlyle, Hazlitt, Mill, Ruskin, and Pater - representative essays

The Twentieth Century

Fiction

Joseph Conrad

Heart of Darkness

Virginia Woolf

To the Lighthouse

Mrs. Dalloway

A Room of One's Own

James Joyce

Ulysses

D. H. Lawrence

Sons and Lovers

Women in Love

Doris Lessing,

one novel from Children of Violence sequence

Nadine Gordimer

Chinua Achebe,

Things Fall Apart

V.S. Naipaul

Drama

George Bernard Shaw

Major Barbara

Mrs. Warren's Profession

Heartbreak House

Or another selection

Samuel Beckett

Endgame

Waiting for Godot

Harold Pinter

The Dumb Waiter

The Birthday Party

Tom Stoppard

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

Poetry

Thomas Hardy

W. B. Yeats

T. S. Eliot

The Waste Land

Four Quartets

"The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock"

W. H. Auden

Dylan Thomas

Philip Larkin

Derek Walcott

Ted Hughes

Seamus Heaney

Critical Works

Hugh Kenner

The Pound Era

Stephen Spender

The Struggle of the Modern

Denis Donoghue

The Old Moderns

NAMES, NUMBERS, AND NOTES

English Department: 256.765.4238

English Department Fax: 256.765.4239

English Department E-mail: English@una.edu

English Department Webpage: http://www.una.edu/english/

Director of Graduate Studies: Dr. Kelly Latchaw

Phone: 256.765.4492

E-mail: kllatchaw@una.edu