Department of History & Political Science

Courses

Offerings in History, Political Science, Philosophy, Religion, and Women's Studies

HISTORY (HI) -- 2010-2011 Catalog


Survey of World Civilization (101, 102) or United States History (201, 202) is prerequisite to all advanced history courses. Majors and minors should enroll in History 301W during the second semester of the junior year.

HI 101. (3) Survey of World Civilization to 1500. A survey of major world civilizations from the earliest times to 1500. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

HI 101H. (3) Honors Survey of World Civilization to 1500. An in-depth survey of major world civilizations from the earliest times to 1500 in a seminar setting.

HI 102. (3) Survey of World Civilization since 1500. A survey of major world civilizations from 1500 to present. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

HI 102H. (3) Honors Survey of World Civilization since 1500. An in-depth survey of major world civilizations since 1500 in a seminar setting. (Spring)

HI 201. (3) United States History to 1877. The European background, colonial developments, establishment of the Nation, the Federalist and Jeffersonian periods, the westward movement, sectional- ism, and the Civil War and Reconstruction. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

HI 201H. (3) Honors United States History to 1877. A survey of American history that will examine the European background, colonial developments, establishment of the nation, the Federalist and Jeffersonian periods, westward movement, sectionalism, and the Civil War and Reconstruction. This course will also introduce students to historiographical issues in American history and emphasize the analysis of written argumentation in the historical disciple. (Fall)

HI 202. (3) United States History since 1877. A continuation of the survey course, emphasizing industrial development, urbanization, labor and agrarian movements, the progressive era, imperialism, World War 1, the 1920's, the New Deal, World War 11, and the period after the second World War. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

HI 202H. (3) United States History since 1877. A survey course of American history from the end of Reconstruction until the contemporary age, emphasizing regional development, industrialization, urbanization, imperialism, World War I, the 1920s, the New Deal, World War II, and the period after the Second World Ward. This course will also introduce students to historiographical issues in American history and emphasize the analysis of written argumentation in the historical discipline. (Spring)

HI 203H. (3) Selected Topics in Latino History, Culture and Geography. This course encompasses and synthesizes cultural, geographical, and historical elements and fosters critical thinking through and interdisciplinary perspective. Also listed as FL 203H and GE 203H but creditable only in field for which registered. Maximum of three semester hours credit. This course, open to students in the Honors Program, is, with departmental approval, also open to other qualified students. (Offered on sufficient demand).

HI 301 W. (3) History and Historical Research. The nature, basic concepts, and methods of history as a profession, historical thinking, research skills and writing. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

HI 303. (3) History and Social Sciences. A study of history and the social science disciplines, emphasizing their relationship, basic concepts, methods and skills, their historical development as professions and careers. This course is intended for students majoring in professional secondary education (grades 6-12) and history or social science. (Fall, Spring)

HI 331. (3) History of Western Philosophy 1. A survey of major philosophers and philosophical concepts from the ancient Greeks to the Renaissance. Also listed as PHL 331 but creditable only in the field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 332. (3) History of Western Philosophy II. A survey of major philosophers and philosophical concepts from the Renaissance to the present. Also listed as PHL 332 but creditable only in the field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 361. (3) History of Alabama. The social, economic, cultural, and political history of Alabama from the days of settlement to the present. (Fall, Spring)

HI 365. (3) Black Americans in United States History. A survey of the role of Black Americans in the United States from the beginning of the slave trade in Africa to the present. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 366. (3) History of Women in the United States. Survey of women's experiences in the United States from the colonial period to the present that examines social, political, economic, and legal developments that shaped women's roles and status in American society. Also listed as WS 366 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Spring, even-numbered years)

HI 370. (3) Women in American Politics. An overview of the role of women in American politics and the role of government in defining the status of women in society. Examines the political behavior of American women and public policies which specifically impact women. Also listed as PS 370 and WS 370 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

HI 410. (3) Integration of Geography and History. The integration of the spatial concepts of geography with the chronological concepts of history. Also listed as GE 410 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 418. (3) Medieval Europe I, 476-1099. A survey of Medieval History from the collapse of Rome to the 1st Crusade. Emphasis on social, cultural, and religious movements, including such topics as the barbarian “invasions,” Huns, King Arthur, the rise of the papacy, monasticism, St. Augustine, Islam, Vikings, Charlemagne, the Norman Conquest, and the early crusades. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

HI 419. (3) Medieval Europe II, 1100-1500. A survey of Medieval History form the 1st Crusade to the end of the Middle Ages. Emphasis on social, cultural, and religious movements, including such topics as the Knights, Courtly Love, Becket, the first Universities, Castles, Cathedrals, Church and State, Heresies, Inquisition, Black Death, Peasant Revolts, Hundred Years War, Joan of Arc. (Spring, even-numbered years)

HI 421. (3) Renaissance and Reformation. A balanced survey of Early Modern Europe, 1450-1648, with emphasis on the Italian and Northern Renaissances, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, over-seas expansion, rise of royal absolutism, and the scientific revolution. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 422. (3) European Imperialism Since 1500. A study of the expansion of European dominance in the world after 1500 and the impact of the West on non-western civilizations. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 423. (3) Early Modern Europe, 1648-1789. The triumph and collapse of absolute monarchy, the evolution of the modern state system, the emergence of modern scientific thought and the Enlightenment, and the onset of an age of Age of Revolution in America, France, and much of the western world. (Fall, even-numbered years)

HI 424. (3) European Popular Culture, 1500-1800. This course explores the lives of common people during the early-modern period. It focuses on how ordinary people made sense of their world – what people thought, how they thought, and how they expressed such thought in behavior. Topics of study include family and community structure, poverty, criminality and violence, oral traditions, popular religions and beliefs, rituals, popular protest and rebellion, witchcraft and vampires, the development of manners, as well as the impact that the political, economic, social, and intellectual changes of the period had on popular culture. (Summer)

HI 425. (3) French Revolution and the Napoleonic Period. The origin and course of the French Revolution, the European reaction, the Napoleonic period in Europe and the Western Hemisphere, the rise of industrialism and Romanticism. (Spring, even-numbered years)

HI 427. (3) Nineteenth Century European History (1815 to 1914). The rise of modern Europe 1815 to 1914. The spread of liberalism, nationalism, and democratic forces; the industrial revolution and the resulting imperialistic and democratic rivalries among the great powers. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

HI 429. (3) Twentieth Century European History (1914 to Present). Recent and contemporary Europe 1914 to present. The two world wars, decline of colonialism, the rise of new great powers, and conflicting ideologies. (Spring, even-numbered years)

HI 430. (3) English Constitutional History. A study of the development of the English Constitution from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present. Also listed as PS 430 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Fall, even-numbered years)

HI 431. (3) History of England to 1688. A survey of English History from prehistoric times to 1688. The course focuses on the evolution of social, economic, and political structures. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

HI 432. (3) History of England Since 1688. A continuation of history 431, emphasizing the growth of democratic process in England and the changes of the last century. (Spring, even-numbered years)

HI 433. (3) History of the Balkans. A survey of Balkan history from the middle ages to the present with emphasis on the place of the Balkans in the international systems of the Mediterranean and European regions, the rise of modern national movements, ethnic cultures and cooperation, and the life of the modern Balkan states. (Fall, even-numbered years)

HI 434. (3) Russian History to 1801. The history of Russia from its beginning to 1801 concentrating on Russia's place among the states and peoples surrounding it, the growth of the Russian state, and Russia's rise as a European power. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

HI 435. (3) Russian History Since 1801. The history of modern Russia with attention to Russia as a European power, problems of internal development, the revolutions of 1917, the Soviet system, and the end of the Soviet empire. (Spring, even-numbered years)

HI 436. (3) Latin American Colonial History. The high aboriginal cultures; European expansion with emphasis on Portuguese and Spanish colonial institutions; exploration, conquest, settlement, and cultural development; the wars for independence. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 437. (3) Latin American History Since 1824. The major countries of Latin America from 1824 to the present with emphasis on diplomatic, political, social, cultural, and economic developments and problems. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 438. (3) History of the Caribbean. An in-depth study of the major Caribbean countries and of the Lesser Antillian colonies from the colonial period to the present, with special emphasis on the institution of slavery, cultural differentials, dictatorship, the role of the United States, nationalism, and communism. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 439. (3) Tourism Development in Global Context. An interdisciplinary course combining a socially and economically contextualized examination of the tourism industry with a case study consideration of tourism development and its social, economic, and environmental problems throughout the world, with especial consideration of the Caribbean. The course will also relate these trends to local tourism development, drawing parallels and contrast between local and global models. This course is designed to meet the needs of hospitality management majors as well as student interesting in the historical problems associated with tourism development. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 440. (3) East Asia to 1300. This course deals with East Asian civilization with a primary focus on the history and cultures of China, Korea, Vietnam, and Japan. The course examines general trends in the political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural history of East Asia. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

HI 441. (3) East Asia Since 1300. This course deals with East Asian civilization with a primary focus on the history and cultures of China, Korea, Vietnam, and Japan. The course examines general trends in the political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural history of East Asia. (Spring, even-numbered years)

HI 444. (3) The Middle East Past and Present. A multidisciplinary study of the history, cultures, and contemporary politics of the Middle East, taught jointly by a political scientist and a historian. Also listed as PS 444 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 446. (3) History of Africa. Traces the history of Africa from earliest times to the present, with emphasis on the period since the mid-nineteenth century. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 448. (3) The History of World War II. A study of the origins, course, and consequences of the Second World War. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 450. (3) American Colonial History. The colonial background of the United States with particular emphasis on the economic, political, and social developments before the American Revolution. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 451. (3) American Revolution 1763-1789. A study of the origins, nature, and consequences of the American Revolution from the middle of the 18th century to the ratification of the federal constitution. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 452. (3) History of the Early Republic, 1789-1848. A study of the beginnings of the American Republic, its formative years, and its development up to the beginnings of the nation’s sectional crisis. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 453. (3) Civil War and Reconstruction. An intensive study of the development of sectionalism and of the period of the Civil War and Reconstruction. (Fall)

HI 454. (3) United States History, 1877-1919. A study of United States history from the end of Reconstruction through World War 1. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 455. (3) United States History, 1920-1945. A study of United States history from 1920 through World War 11. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 456. (3) Recent United States History. The United States since 1945. A study of the United States history from the end of World War 11 to the present with major emphasis being placed on domestic and international trends and problems. (Spring)

HI 461. (3) History of the South. An institutional approach to the political, economic, and social developments of the region, looking toward an understanding of present conditions and problems of the South. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

HI 467. (3) History of the West. Relation of westward movement to the development of the United States; factors responsible for and composition of various segments of the general movements; problems of frontier and the influence of the frontier on American institutions. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 470. (3) History of Asian Religions. This course examines both the historical development and current content of the religious and philosophical traditions of Asia with special emphasis on Confucianism, Daoism, Shintoism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Hinduism. The course covers Japan, China, India, Tibet, other parts of Southeast Asia and East Asia. For each of these traditions, we will consider its history and mythology, the great themes and ideas which have shaped the worlds of meaning for the followers, and the ways of worshiping and achieving the good life, individually and socially. Also listed as RE 470 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Summer)

HI 472. (3) Historical Geography of the United States. The role of geographic conditions in the settlement and subsequent development of the United States. Also listed as GE 472 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 473. (3) United States Economic History. The economic forces in agriculture, manufacturing, commerce, finance, transportation, and labor. The colonial age, the agricultural era, and the industrial state in America. Also listed as EC 473 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Fall)

HI 474. (3) United States Military History. A study of military in the history of the United States and the role of the military institutions and professionals in the society they serve. (Spring)

HI 475. (3) Social and Cultural History of the United States. Topics in social and cultural history of the United States. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 477. (3) Constitutional History of the United States. The principles of the American constitutional system. The leading decisions of the Supreme Court with reference to federal-state governmental relation- ship, citizenship, police power, eminent domain, and to the commerce, contract, and due process clauses of the Federal Constitution. Also listed as PS 477 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Spring, Summer)

HI 478. (3) The Diplomatic History of the United States. A study of the United States diplomatic relations with foreign nations since 1778 with special emphasis on American growth and development. Also listed as PS 478 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 479. (3) History of Religion in the United States. A nonsectarian study of the role of religion in American history. Also listed as RE 479 but creditable only in the field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 481. (3) Contemporary United States Foreign Policy. A study of the United States foreign policy from World War II to the present. Also listed as PS 481 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Fall)

HI 482. (3) Science & Technology I, to 1687. Part one of a survey of the History of Science and Technology, from Neanderthals to Newton. Emphasis on social and cultural factors, including such topics as the Pyramid Building, Stonehenge, Greek Science and Technology, Medieval Science and Technology, the Scientific Revolution, the Trial of Galileo, and the Newtonian World. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 483. (3) Science and Technology II, 1687 to Present. Part two of a survey of the History of Science and Technology from Newton to the Nuclear Age. Emphasis on social and cultural factors, including such topics as the Industrial Revolution, the Darwinian Revolution, Germ Theory, Technological Imperialism (Western weaponry), Transportation, Relativity, the A-Bomb, and the Human Genome Project. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 484. (3) Philosophical Borderlands of Science and Religion. An interdisciplinary course concerning the “Demarcation Question”— where do the borders of science end and religion begin? Both critical reasoning and historical analysis of those areas that have been perceived on the fringes of science, including Alchemy, Astrology, Atlantis, Galileo and the Church, Mesmerism, Spiritualism, Theosophy, ESP, Near-Death Experiences, UFO’s and Alien Abductions, Eugenics, the New Age Movements, and the Tao of Physics. A strong philosophical component is included, particularly the application of logical fallacies. Also listed as PHL 484 and RE 484 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 490. (1-3) Special Topics. A study of one or more carefully selected historical topics. The length of time and amount of study will determine amount of credit earned. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 491. (3) History Internship Practicum. (Open only to senior majors in history and with departmental approval.) Professional work situations in which the knowledge and skills appropriate to the historical profession can be practiced under departmental supervision and evaluation. Departmental approval required. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

HI 499. (3) Independent Study-Practicum. Open to senior majors on approval of the department chair. Provides for independent study, research, or special field experience under departmental determination, supervision, and evaluation. (Fail, Spring, Summer)

HI 510. (3) Integration of Geography and History. The integration of the spatial concepts of geography with the chronological concepts of history. Also listed as GE 510 but creditable only in the field for which registered.

HI 518. (3) Medieval Europe I, 476-1099. A survey of Medieval History from the collapse of Rome to the 1st Crusade. Emphasis on social, cultural, and religious movements, including such topics as the barbarian “invasions,” Huns, King Arthur, the rise of the papacy, monasticism, St. Augustine, Islam, Vikings, Charlemagne, the Norman Conquest, and the early crusades. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

HI 519. (3) Medieval Europe II, 1100-1500. A survey of Medieval History form the 1st Crusade to the end of the Middle Ages. Emphasis on social, cultural, and religious movements, including such topics as the Knights, Courtly Love, Becket, the first Universities, Castles, Cathedrals, Church and State, Heresies, Inquisition, Black Death, Peasant Revolts, Hundred Years War, Joan of Arc. (Spring, even-numbered years)

HI 521. (3) Renaissance and Reformation. A balanced survey of Early Modern Europe, 1450-1648, with emphasis on the Italian and Northern Renaissances, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, over-seas expansion, rise of royal absolutism, and the scientific revolution. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 522. (3) European Imperialism Since 1500. A study of the expansion of European dominance in the world after 1500 and the impact of the West on non-western civilizations. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 523. (3) Early Modern Europe, 1648-1789. The triumph and collapse of absolute monarchy, the evolution of the modern state system, the emergence of modern scientific thought and the Enlightenment, and the onset of an age of Age of Revolution in America, France, and much of the western world. (Fall, even-numbered years)

HI 524. (3) European Popular Culture, 1500-1800. This course explores the lives of common people during the early-modern period. It focuses on how ordinary people made sense of their world – what people thought, how they thought, and how they expressed such thought in behavior. Topics of study include family and community structure, poverty, criminality and violence, oral traditions, popular religions and beliefs, rituals, popular protest and rebellion, witchcraft and vampires, the development of manners, as well as the impact that the political, economic, social, and intellectual changes of the period had on popular culture. (Summer)

HI 525. (3) French Revolution and the Napoleonic Period. The origin and course of the French Revolution, the European reaction, the Napoleonic period in Europe and the Western Hemisphere, the rise of industrialism and Romanticism. (Spring, even-numbered years)

HI 527. (3) Nineteenth Century European History (1815 to 1914). The rise of modern Europe 1815 to 1914. The spread of liberalism, nationalism, and democratic forces; the industrial revolution and the resulting imperialistic and democratic rivalries among the great powers. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

HI 529. (3) Twentieth Century European History (1914 to Present). Recent and contemporary Europe 1914 to present. The two world wars, decline of colonialism, the rise of new great powers, and conflicting ideologies. (Spring, even-numbered years)

HI 530. (3) English Constitutional History. A study of the development of the English Constitution from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present. Also listed as PS 430 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Fall, even-numbered years)

HI 531. (3) History of England to 1688. A survey of English History from prehistoric times to 1688. The course focuses on the evolution of social, economic, and political structures. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

HI 532. (3) History of England Since 1688. A continuation of history 431, emphasizing the growth of democratic process in England and the changes of the last century. (Spring, even-numbered years)

HI 533. (3) History of the Balkans. A survey of Balkan history from the middle ages to the present with emphasis on the place of the Balkans in the international systems of the Mediterranean and European regions, the rise of modern national movements, ethnic cultures and cooperation, and the life of the modern Balkan states. (Fall, even-numbered years)

HI 534. (3) Russian History to 1801. The history of Russia from its beginning to 1801 concentrating on Russia's place among the states and peoples surrounding it, the growth of the Russian state, and Russia's rise as a European power. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

HI 535. (3) Russian History Since 1801. The history of modern Russia with attention to Russia as a European power, problems of internal development, the revolutions of 1917, the Soviet system, and the end of the Soviet empire. (Spring, even-numbered years)

HI 536. (3) Latin American Colonial History. The high aboriginal cultures; European expansion with emphasis on Portuguese and Spanish colonial institutions; exploration, conquest, settlement, and cultural development; the wars for independence. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 537. (3) Latin American History Since 1824. The major countries of Latin America from 1824 to the present with emphasis on diplomatic, political, social, cultural, and economic developments and problems. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 538. (3) History of the Caribbean. An in-depth study of the major Caribbean countries and of the Lesser Antillian colonies from the colonial period to the present, with special emphasis on the institution of slavery, cultural differentials, dictatorship, the role of the United States, nationalism, and communism. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 539. (3) Tourism Development in Global Context. An interdisciplinary course combining a socially and economically contextualized examination of the tourism industry with a case study consideration of tourism development and its social, economic, and environmental problems throughout the world, with especial consideration of the Caribbean. The course will also relate these trends to local tourism development, drawing parallels and contrast between local and global models. This course is designed to meet the needs of hospitality management majors as well as student interesting in the historical problems associated with tourism development. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 540. (3) East Asia to 1300. This course deals with East Asian civilization with a primary focus on the history and cultures of China, Korea, Vietnam, and Japan. The course examines general trends in the political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural history of East Asia. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

HI 541. (3) East Asia Since 1300. This course deals with East Asian civilization with a primary focus on the history and cultures of China, Korea, Vietnam, and Japan. The course examines general trends in the political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural history of East Asia. (Spring, even-numbered years)

HI 544. (3) The Middle East Past and Present. A multidisciplinary study of the history, cultures, and contemporary politics of the Middle East, taught jointly by a political scientist and a historian. Also listed as PS 444 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 546. (3) History of Africa. Traces the history of Africa from earliest times to the present, with emphasis on the period since the mid-nineteenth century. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 548. (3) The History of World War II. A study of the origins, course, and consequences of the Second World War. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 550. (3) American Colonial History. The colonial background of the United States with particular emphasis on the economic, political, and social developments before the American Revolution. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 551. (3) American Revolution 1763-1789. A study of the origins, nature, and consequences of the American Revolution from the middle of the 18th century to the ratification of the federal constitution. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 552. (3) History of the Early Republic, 1789-1848. A study of the beginnings of the American Republic, its formative years, and its development up to the beginnings of the nation’s sectional crisis. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 553. (3) Civil War and Reconstruction. An intensive study of the development of sectionalism and of the period of the Civil War and Reconstruction. (Fall)

HI 554. (3) United States History, 1877-1919. A study of United States history from the end of Reconstruction through World War 1. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 555. (3) United States History, 1920-1945. A study of United States history from 1920 through World War 11. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 556. (3) Recent United States History. The United States since 1945. A study of the United States history from the end of World War 11 to the present with major emphasis being placed on domestic and international trends and problems. (Spring)

HI 561. (3) History of the South. An institutional approach to the political, economic, and social developments of the region, looking toward an understanding of present conditions and problems of the South. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

HI 567. (3) History of the West. Relation of westward movement to the development of the United States; factors responsible for and composition of various segments of the general movements; problems of frontier and the influence of the frontier on American institutions. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 570. (3) History of Asian Religions. This course examines both the historical development and current content of the religious and philosophical traditions of Asia with special emphasis on Confucianism, Daoism, Shintoism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Hinduism. The course covers Japan, China, India, Tibet, other parts of Southeast Asia and East Asia. For each of these traditions, we will consider its history and mythology, the great themes and ideas which have shaped the worlds of meaning for the followers, and the ways of worshiping and achieving the good life, individually and socially. Also listed as RE 470 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Summer)

HI 572. (3) Historical Geography of the United States. The role of geographic conditions in the settlement and subsequent development of the United States. Also listed as GE 472 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 573. (3) United States Economic History. The economic forces in agriculture, manufacturing, commerce, finance, transportation, and labor. The colonial age, the agricultural era, and the industrial state in America. Also listed as EC 473 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Fall)

HI 574. (3) United States Military History. A study of military in the history of the United States and the role of the military institutions and professionals in the society they serve. (Spring)

HI 575. (3) Social and Cultural History of the United States. Topics in social and cultural history of the United States. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 577. (3) Constitutional History of the United States. The principles of the American constitutional system. The leading decisions of the Supreme Court with reference to federal-state governmental relation- ship, citizenship, police power, eminent domain, and to the commerce, contract, and due process clauses of the Federal Constitution. Also listed as PS 477 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Spring, Summer)

HI 578. (3) The Diplomatic History of the United States. A study of the United States diplomatic relations with foreign nations since 1778 with special emphasis on American growth and development. Also listed as PS 478 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 579. (3) History of Religion in the United States. A nonsectarian study of the role of religion in American history. Also listed as RE 479 but creditable only in the field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 581. (3) Contemporary United States Foreign Policy. A study of the United States foreign policy from World War II to the present. Also listed as PS 481 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Fall)

HI 582. (3) Science & Technology I, to 1687. Part one of a survey of the History of Science and Technology, from Neanderthals to Newton. Emphasis on social and cultural factors, including such topics as the Pyramid Building, Stonehenge, Greek Science and Technology, Medieval Science and Technology, the Scientific Revolution, the Trial of Galileo, and the Newtonian World. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 583. (3) Science and Technology II, 1687 to Present. Part two of a survey of the History of Science and Technology from Newton to the Nuclear Age. Emphasis on social and cultural factors, including such topics as the Industrial Revolution, the Darwinian Revolution, Germ Theory, Technological Imperialism (Western weaponry), Transportation, Relativity, the A-Bomb, and the Human Genome Project. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 584. (3) Philosophical Borderlands of Science and Religion. An interdisciplinary course concerning the “Demarcation Question”— where do the borders of science end and religion begin? Both critical reasoning and historical analysis of those areas that have been perceived on the fringes of science, including Alchemy, Astrology, Atlantis, Galileo and the Church, Mesmerism, Spiritualism, Theosophy, ESP, Near-Death Experiences, UFO’s and Alien Abductions, Eugenics, the New Age Movements, and the Tao of Physics. A strong philosophical component is included, particularly the application of logical fallacies. Also listed as PHL 484 and RE 484 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 590. (1-3) Special Topics. A study of one or more carefully selected historical topics. The length of time and amount of study will determine amount of credit earned. (Offered on sufficient demand)

HI 591. (3) History Internship Practicum. (Open only to senior majors in history and with departmental approval.) Professional work situations in which the knowledge and skills appropriate to the historical profession can be practiced under departmental supervision and evaluation. Departmental approval required. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

HI 599. (3) Independent Study-Practicum. Open to senior majors on approval of the department chair. Provides for independent study, research, or special field experience under departmental determination, supervision, and evaluation. (Fail, Spring, Summer)

HI 605. (3) Historiography and Methodology. A study of writing and philosophy of history, investigative techniques, and the mechanics of historical research and documentation.

HI 607. (3) Directed Research and Study. Requires a major research and writing project in an appropriate subject matter area. Course may be repeated for credit as different subject matter areas are offered.

HI 611. (3) Studies in U.S. History (1607-1865). Examination of selected historical problems of importance in American history in the period extending through the Civil War.

HI 612. (3) Studies in U.S. History (1865 to Present). Examination of selected historical problems of importance in American history since the Civil War with emphasis upon analysis and interpretation.

HI 621. (3) Studies in European History to 1815. Examination of selected historical problems in European history to 1815 with emphasis on analysis and interpretation.

HI 622. (3) Studies in European History Since 1815. Examination of selected historical problems in European history since 1815 with emphasis upon analysis and interpretation.

HI 625. (3) History and Social Studies in the Secondary School. Study of history and social science programs in secondary school with emphasis on goals, instructional objectives, materials, and techniques.

HI 640. (3) Seminar in U.S. History. Research and writing based seminar on topics in American history. May be repeated for credit as course topics will vary. (Fall)

HI 641. (3) Seminar in European History. Research and writing based seminar on topics in European history. May be repeated for credit as course topics will vary. (Spring)

HI 690 (3). Special Topics in History. A variety of topics will be offered under the course number and title as the need arises. Course may be repeated for credit as different topics in history are offered.

HI 695 (3-6) Thesis. Selection of a research topic, collection and analysis of primary and secondary historical sources, composition of and public defense of a thesis.

HI 698. (0) Comprehensive Examination. Orientation to and administration of a written comprehensive examination for the MA in History program. A noncredit course required of all candidates for the non-thesis option. The course is to be taken in the last term in which the student is expected to complete all other program requirements. A grade of “S” indicating satisfactory performance or a grade of “U” for unsatisfactory will be recorded on the transcript. A grade of “S” is required for graduation; the course may be repeated once. Prerequisite: student must have completed all other program requirements or be enrolled in the last course for program completion


POLITICAL SCIENCE (PS)


PS 241 or departmental approval is prerequisite to all advanced political science courses.

PS 241. (3) United States Government and Politics. A study of the institutions and processes of government, federalism, electoral behavior, interest groups, and the role of the mass media. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

PS 242. (3) Contemporary Issues in United States Politics. An examination of current major domestic and foreign policy issues. (Fall, Spring)

PS 243. (3) State and Local Government and Politics. A study of United States federalism with an emphasis on Alabama state and local government and politics. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

PS 244. (3) Public Policy and Administration. An introduction to public policy and administration at all levels of government, federal, state, and local. (Spring)

PS 301 W. (3) Political Science Scope and Methods. A study of the development of political science, its relation to the other social sciences, and the current research methodologies employed by political scientists. (Spring)

PS 302. (3) Comparative Government and Politics. A comparative study of the political forces, processes, institutions and performances of foreign political systems. (Fall)

PS 303 (3) World Politics. A general examination of many of the forces and practices that influence contemporary world politics. (Spring)

PS 304. (3) Political Theory. An introduction to political theory from the Pre-Modern period to the present. (Spring)

PS 311. (3) Public Administration. This course is a study of the public administration literature. The course examines the evolution of the fields; the politics and environment under which governance occurs; and the constraints that face public administrators in serving the public good. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

PS 342. (3) Parties, Elections and Voting Behavior. A study of the development and functions of political parties, the role of elections, public opinion, interest groups, modern political campaigns and theories of individual and group voting behavior. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PS 344. (3) Judicial Process and Behavior. A study of the organization and structure of courts in the United States, how cases reach the courts, the judicial decision-making process, issues surrounding judicial power, interpretation and decision implementation. (Fall)

PS 345. (3) Congress and the Presidency. A study of the development and organization of the legislative and executive branches with particular attention to the committee system, parties in Congress, and the Presidency. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PS 351. (3) Ancient and Medieval Political Theory. A study of the political thought of prominent political philosophers from Socrates to Machiavelli. (Fall)

PS 352. (3) Modern Political Theory. A study of the political thought of prominent political philosophers from Hobbes to the present. (Spring)

PS 370. (3) Women in American Politics. An overview of the role of women in American politics and the role of government in defining the status of women in society. Examines the political behavior of American women and public policies which specifically impact women. Also listed as WS 370 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

PS 402. (3) Problems in Political Geography. The place of geographic factors in conditioning the basic political structure of major nations. Also listed as GE 402 but creditable only in field for which registered (Fall)

PS 412. (3) Introduction to Public Policy. This course is a study of how public policy is made in the United States. An emphasis will be placed on the role that constitutional structures and government agencies play at each stage of the policy process, as well as the individual and collective actions of lawmakers, interest groups, and bureaucrats. (Spring, even numbered years)

PS 413. (3) Public Organization and Theory. This course is a study of the many theories that attempt to explain how organizations and the people in them will behave in varying organizational structures, cultures, and environments. Special attention is given the role of democratic accountability, justice, and fairness. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PS 414. (3) Urban Politics. This course examines major issues in urban politics, related trends, and problems unique to metropolitan areas. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PS 415. (3) Ethics in Administrative Leadership. This course examines major ethical issues that arise in public administration. Theoretical justification and application for ethical problems that arise in leadership positions will be explored. Also listed as PHL 415 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Spring, even-numbered years)

PS 430. (3) English Constitutional History. A study of the development of the English Constitution from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present. Also listed as Hi 430 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Fall, even-numbered years)

PS 431. (3) International Relations. An introduction to the nature of international relations, and to the forces and practices prevalent in contemporary world politics. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

PS 435. (3) International Organization. A study of the development, problems, and role of international organizations, with special emphasis on the United Nations and its agencies. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PS 477. (3) Constitutional History of the United States. The principles of the American constitutional system. The leading decisions of the Supreme Court with reference to federal-state governmental relation- ship, citizenship, police power, eminent domain, and to the commerce, contract, and due process clauses of the Federal Constitution. Also listed as Hi 477 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Spring, Summer)

PS 478. (3) The Diplomatic History of the United States. A study of the United States diplomatic relations with foreign nations since 1778 with special emphasis on American growth and development. Also listed as Hi 478 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PS 481. (3) Contemporary United States Foreign Policy. A study of the United States foreign policy from World War 11 to the present. Also listed as Hi 481 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Summer)

PS 489. (3) American Political Thought. A study focusing on American political thought from the Federalists/Anti-Federalists debates to contemporary thinkers. (Spring)

PS 490. (1-3) Special Topics. A study of one or more major political science topics. The length of time and the amount of study on each topic will determine the amount of credit earned. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PS 495. (3) Government Internship Practicum. (Open only to senior majors in political science.) Professional work situations in government through special internship programs under departmental supervision and evaluation. Departmental approval required. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

PS 499. (3) Independent Study-Practicum. Open to senior majors in political science. Provides for independent study, research, or special field experience under departmental determination, supervision, and evaluation. (Fall, Spring, Summer)


POLITICAL SCIENCE – GRADUATE COURSES (2010-2011 Catalog)


PS 502. Problems in Political Geography. The role of geographic factors in influencing the political structure of nations. Also listed as GE 502 but creditable only in the field for which registered.

PS 530. English Constitutional History. The English Constitution from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present. Also listed as HI 530 but creditable only in the field for which registered.

PS 531. International Relations. The nature of international relations.

PS 533. Comparative Government and Politics. The systems of government of major countries of the world.

PS 535. International Organization. The development problems and role of international organizations.

PS 544. The Middle East Past and Present. Multidisciplinary study of the history, cultures, and contemporary politics of the Middle East. Also listed as HI 544 but creditable only in the field for which registered.

PS 577. Constitutional History of the United States. The principles of the American constitutional system. Also listed as Hi 577 but creditable only in the field for which registered.

PS 578. The Diplomatic History of the United States. The United States diplomatic relations with foreign nations since 1778. Also listed as Hi 578 but creditable only in the field for which registered.

PS 581. Contemporary United States Foreign Policy. United States foreign policy from World War II to the present. Also listed as Hi 581 but creditable only in the field for which registered.

PS 595. Government Internship Practicum. Professional work situations in government under departmental supervision.

PS 599. Independent Study-Practicum. Independent study, research, or special field experience under departmental supervision.


PHILOSOPHY (PHL)


PHL 201. (3) Introduction to Philosophy. An examination of humanity‘s quest for wisdom. Emphasis is placed on the ideas, methodologies, and problems of classic and contemporary philosophy. Topics of study may include the nature of human agency and freedom, how meaning and value are derived and justified, threats to a meaningful life, and how these threats might be ameliorated. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

PHL 201H. (3) Introduction to Philosophy - Honors. This course is an introduction to philosophy that provides a rigorous intellectual environment for honors students. The course balances a generally historical approach to the philosophical tradition of the West with a topical treatment of important aspects of philosophy such as logic, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, politics, esthetics, and religion. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PHL 202. (3) Logic. A study of the methodology of reasoning. Special attention given to understanding argument structure, recognizing various fallacies, and constructing good arguments. (Fall)

PHL 205. (3) Ethics. A study of the nature of morality. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of traditional ethical theories and their application to contemporary moral problems. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

PHL 303. (3) Philosophy of Religion. A philosophical examination of religion. Topics covered may include arguments for and against the existence of God, the nature of religious experiences, the problem of evil, characteristics of divine nature religious belief and moral justification, and the relationship between faith and knowledge. Also listed as RE 303 but creditable only in the field for which registered. (Spring)

PHL 331. (3) History of Western Philosophy I. A survey of major philosophers and philosophical concepts from the ancient Greeks to the Renaissance. Also listed as HI 331 but creditable only in the field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PHL 332. (3) History of Western Philosophy II. A survey of major philosophers and philosophical concepts from the Renaissance to the present. Also listed as HI 332 but creditable only in the field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PHL 402. (3) Religion and Ethics. A study of ethics in their relation to the personal, moral, and social problems of today. Also listed as RE 402 but creditable only in the field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PHL 415. (3) Ethics in Administrative Leadership. This course examines major ethical issues that arise in public administration. Theoretical justification and application for ethical problems that arise in leadership positions will be explored. Also listed as PS 415 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Spring, even-numbered years)

PHL 484. (3) Philosophical Borderlands of Science and Religion. An interdisciplinary course concerning the “Demarcation Question”—where do the borders of science end and religion begin? Both critical reasoning and historical analysis of those areas that have been perceived on the fringes of science, including: Alchemy, Astrology, Atlantis, Galileo and the Church, Mesmerism, Spiritualism, Theosophy, ESP, Near-Death Experiences, UFO’s and Alien Abductions, Eugenics, the New Age Movements, and the Tao of Physics. A strong philosophical component is included, particularly the application of logical fallacies. Also listed as HI 484 and RE 484 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PHL 490. (1-3) Special Topics. A study of one or more carefully selected topics in philosophy. The length of time and amount of study will determine the amount of credit earned. (Offered on sufficient demand)


RELIGION (RE)


RE 221. (3) Old Testament Introduction. Study of the writings of the Old Testament with special attention to the methods, principles, and tools for such study and to the historical, literary, and theological aspects and significance of these writings. (Offered on sufficient demand)

RE 231. (3) New Testament Introduction. Study of the writings of the New Testament with special attention to the methods, principles, and tools for such study and to the historical, literary, and theological aspects and significance to these writings. (Offered on sufficient demand)

RE 303. (3) Philosophy of Religion. The value and function of religion with an attempt to give students an understanding of religion to enable them to work out their own philosophy. Also listed as PHL 303 but creditable only in the field for which registered. (Spring)

RE 321. (3) Life of Jesus. The life and teachings of Jesus based primarily on the four Gospels with practical applications in relation to our current personal and social problems. (Offered on sufficient demand)

RE 331. (3) Life and Letters of Paul. The life and teachings of Paul based on The Acts and The Epistles of Paul. (Offered on sufficient demand)

RE 401. (3) Religions of the World. An introduction to the major religious traditions of today's world. Attention will be given to the origins, founders, and basic teachings of these religions and to the interrelation of the religions and the cultures of peoples. (Offered on sufficient demand)

RE 402. (3) Religion and Ethics. A study of ethics in their relation to the personal, moral, and social problems of today. Also listed as PHL 402 but creditable only in the field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

RE 470. (3) History of Asian Religions. This course examines both the historical development and current content of the religious and philosophical traditions of Asia with special emphasis on Confucianism, Daoism, Shintoism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Hinduism. The course covers Japan, China, India, Tibet, other parts of Southeast Asia and East Asia. For each of these traditions, we will consider its history and mythology, the great themes and ideas which have shaped the worlds of meaning for the followers, and the ways of worshiping and achieving the good life, individually and socially. Also listed as RE 470 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Summer)

RE 479. (3) History of Religion in the United States. A nonsectarian study of the role of religion in American history. Also listed as Hi 479 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

RE 490. (1-3) Special Topics. A study of one or more carefully selected religion topics. The length of time and amount of study will determine amount of credit earned. (Offered on sufficient demand)