The UNA English Department Announces:

February 28-29th, 2020

Migration: Shifting to and fro and In-between

While influxes of immigrants/migrants/refugees arriving to the U.S. dominate conceptualizations of identity and belonging, it is vital to analyze our deeper understandings of migration. Migration—the act of moving from one place to another—exists in a number of ways, not just geographically. So, how do our limited ways of thinking of migration affect its potential in certain fields/entities/theories?

Migration can be a physical movement, but also an emotional or psychological movement away from something or toward something new. The act of migrating can alter identity. Whether this identity is altered by a shift in time, a change of location, or a shift in personhood, migration invites an adoption of a new identity based on the new social, mental, or natural environment. Ultimately, the end result of migration binds an individual to a new identity. We’re interested in examining a potential new identity that results from different forms or processes of migration. There is a need to dissect the fullness of this process of movement, more specifically, a need to evaluate not only the travel or shifting from a previous to current identity, but the sometimes fuzzy, uncertain in-between state. We wish to focus on the “rupturing” that must occur for this new identity to form.

We encourage papers that delve into issues of identity (racial, ethnic, gender, sexual, etc.) and immigration; however, we are also open to other aspects or themes of migration. We even encourage papers that evolve/restructure/or challenge conventional ways of thinking of migration and identity.

Beyond issues of geographic migration, potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

Free to incarcerated; incarcerated to free

Embodying/embracing new or hidden identities (gender, sexuality, class, religion, orientation, occupation)

 Undocumented to documented; Citizen to Noncitizen

Single to Married; Married to Divorced

 

The University of North Alabama’s Department of English encourages papers from undergraduates, graduates, and recent graduates (within the last three years). All fields and disciplines are welcomed and encouraged to participate. What does migration look like in your discipline? We are partnering with the ACETA conference this year, so the grad conference will take place February 28-29. Undergraduates will present on the 28th and graduate students will present on the 29th. All fields and disciplines are welcomed and encouraged to participate. Various formats of presentations are welcomed and encouraged. Proposal requirements: Proposals must be 300-500 words. Please send to agarcia3@una.edu by January 20th, 2020.  Selected proposals will be notified shortly after the submission date.