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English Department Graduate Courses

EN 501. Chaucer. (3 Credits)

The major and minor works of Chaucer, including The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Creseyde.

EN 502. Milton. (3 Credits)

Although some prose works are studied, the emphasis is on John Milton as a poet, with special attention to Paradise Lost.

EN 504. Anglo-Saxon Language and Literature. (3 Credits)

This course will enable students to achieve basic reading fluency in Old English. It is the study of the language and literature of the Anglo-Saxon period. (449 AD to 1066 AD). Students will learn the grammar of Old English and will be able to read, translate, and interpret texts such as The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Aelfric’s homilies. The Dream of the Road, and Beowulf. Students will also consider these texts in connection with the cultural and historical backgrounds. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 505. African-American Literature. (3 Credits)

An investigation of the development of African-American literature from the earliest works to the present. Critical examination of selected writers of poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction.

EN 506. Studies in Literature I. (3 Credits)

Studies in a specific author. genre. or time period. Focus may be English literature. American literature, literature oithe western world, or other areas of world literature. These courses carry a Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisflictorv (U) grade and do not count toward the required content hours for the Masters Degree in English. Prerequisite: permission of the I)irector of Graduate Studies.(Aailable only to international students in the Master ot Arts in English Bridge Program). (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 507. Studies in Literature II. (3 Credits)

Studies in a specific author. genre. or time period. Focus may be English literature. American literature, literature oithe western world, or other areas of world literature. These courses carry a Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisflictorv (U) grade and do not count toward the required content hours for the Masters Degree in English. Prerequisite: permission of the I)irector of Graduate Studies.(Aailable only to international students in the Master ot Arts in English Bridge Program). (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 508. Studies in Literature III. (3 Credits)

Studies in a specific author. genre. or time period. Focus may be English literature. American literature, literature oithe western world, or other areas of world literature. These courses carry a Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisflictorv (U) grade and do not count toward the required content hours for the Masters Degree in English. Prerequisite: permission of the I)irector of Graduate Studies.(Aailable only to international students in the Master ot Arts in English Bridge Program). (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 509. Studies in Literature IV. (3 Credits)

Studies in a specific author. genre. or time period. Focus may be English literature. American literature, literature oithe western world, or other areas of world literature. These courses carry a Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisflictorv (U) grade and do not count toward the required content hours for the Masters Degree in English. Prerequisite: permission of the I)irector of Graduate Studies.(Aailable only to international students in the Master ot Arts in English Bridge Program). (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 534W. Language and Gender. (3 Credits)

This course closely examines the nature and function of sex differences in written and spoken language on a cross-cultural basis. While the emphasis is on spoken and written language, some attention is also paid to differences in nonverbal communication. The contrasts between stereotypes, about how women and men communicate, and the actual occurring patterns are carefully examined. The significance of different communication patterns is considered in connection with theoretical models drawn from sociolinguistics, anthropology, and psychology.

EN 535W. Writing Protest and Dissent. (3 Credits)

Explores some of the 400 years of rich writings and accounts of America’s tradition of protest and dissent, and uses these as examples to guide and inspire the student writing of protest literature. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

EN 539. Technical Editing. (3 Credits)

This course is an interactive practice of the skills asked of technical editors. Using a workshop setting, students will be introduced to the roles technical editors play within various organizations. Students will complete several technical editing projects using both digital and hard copy editing methods. The ethics of technical editors will also be examined.

EN 540W. Grant Writing. (3 Credits)

This course provides writing students with the advanced knowledge necessary to research grant opportunities, design conceptual grant programs, develop and assess budgetary issues and prepare a final grant project for full review. Special focus is placed on nonprofit organizations. The curriculum is based on grant writing opportunities for existing non-profit organizations. Students will learn about the opportunities available to them as grant writers.

EN 541. History of the English Language. (3 Credits)

Development of the English language and of modern English usage. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 542. Survey of Grammar. (3 Credits)

A study of contemporary English grammar comprising primarily morphology and syntax, with discussion of register and dialect. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

EN 543. Instruction of Composition. (3 Credits)

Approaches to and practice in the instruction of English composition.

EN 544W. Grant Writing for the Creative Writer. (3 Credits)

This course is designed for students of Creative Writing, professionals who are teaching Creative Writing, and students working in the non-academic and non-profit world who plan to submit their works for grants, fellowships, and/or retreats in the Arts and Humanities. (Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 545W. Multimodal Writing. (3 Credits)

This course closely examines theories of Multimodality. Students will begin with a close examination of Gunther Kress, the father of multimodality and end with a 360 degree examination of the future impact multimodal writing will have within the field. A case study approach will be used to introduce students to the various problem solving techniques that writers must use when considering the impact of multimodality.

EN 550. Studies in American Folklore. (3 Credits)

Sources, backgrounds, and morphology of American folklore. Emphasis is given to research methods and to fieldwork.

EN 552. The American Novel. (3 Credits)

Intensive study of the American novel with regard to genre, history, them, or major authors. (Spring, even numbered years)

EN 553. The English Novel. (3 Credits)

Representative works in the development of the English novel.

EN 555W. Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction and Drama. (3 Credits)

A workshop approach to writing and editing fiction and drama for publication, with special emphasis on structure, theme, and characterization.

EN 556W. Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry and Creative Non-fiction. (3 Credits)

A workshop approach to writing and editing poetry and creative nonfiction for publication with emphasis on structure, theme, and craft.

EN 560. Literature of the American Frontier. (3 Credits)

An examination of the literature of the American frontier, beginning with authors such as James Fenimore Cooper and moving forward to modern writers such as Cormac McCarthy. Emphasis is on the changing perspective of the frontier as it progressed from the East coast to the West.

EN 564. The Contemporary American Novel. (3 Credits)

A study of the changing forms and emerging themes of the American novel since in the last ten years. (Fall, even-numbered years)

EN 565. Contemporary Poetry. (3 Credits)

Extensive reading in the works of the contemporary British and American poets, with emphasis on their relation to the literary traditions of the past and their innovations and experiments in matter and form.

EN 566. Sociolinguistics. (3 Credits)

This course serves the student as an exploration of the theories and applications of socially constitued approaches to language and its uses, with a focus on American language varieties.

EN 572W. Rhetoric: Argument and Style. (3 Credits)

Examination of the ideas in writing and speech from classical Greek origins to modern times, with a focus on composition and on analysis of essays and speeches. Also listed as COM 572W but creditable only in the field for which registered.

EN 575W. Literacy, Culture, and Theory. (3 Credits)

This course is an extensive study of the major themes that inform the understanding of written and oral discourse. Emphasis is given to the historical impact the written word has had upon the technological development of modern society.

EN 581. Selected Topics in Literature. (3 Credits)

Concentrated study in specific narrow areas of world literature.

EN 594. Special Topics in Film Studies. (3 Credits)

A study of a selected period or subject in film. Topics might include censorship in cineama; women in film; avant-garde cinema; national cinemas; film movements; spirituality in film; race and cinema; film rhetoric; or adaptaion. (Spring odd-numbered years or on sufficient demand).

EN 595W. Selected Topics in Writing. (3 Credits)

Concentrated study in specific areas of written composition. (Spring)

EN 596. Selected Topics in English Litrature. (3 Credits)

Concentrated study in specific narrow areas of English literature.

EN 597. Selected Topics in American Literature. (3 Credits)

Concentrated study in narrow areas of American literature.

EN 601. Introduction to Graduate Studies: Bibliography and Research. (3 Credits)

Emphasis on contemporary methods and aims of literary research; special readings designed to familiarize students with a wide range of available source materials and research techniques. Required of students seeking a master's degree in English.

EN 602W. Introduction to Graduate Studies: Writing Seminar. (3 Credits)

This course is an intensive study of written discourse typical of professional communities in business, education, and government. Attention will be given to global understandings of context to underscore the interdependence of technical and creative agency within writing.

EN 609W. Rhetorical Theory and Culture. (3 Credits)

The tradition of rhetoric in Western culture extends almost 3000 years through history an impacts nearly every facet of human communication. From Aristotle to the war on terrorism, this course covers a broad spectrum of definitions about rhetoric and the uses of rhetoric in business and creative endeavors in a global society.

EN 610W. Composition Theory. (3 Credits)

This course examines theories of written composition and the ways in which those theories inform education and business. Central to this study is an historical overview of the discipline, focusing on process and post process theories of composition that have emerged since the late 1960's.

EN 611. Studies in American Literature to 1830. (3 Credits)

Selected major authors, works, themes, and/or genres from the colonial period to the early Republic. (Fall, even-numbered years)

EN 612. American Literature 1830 to 1900. (3 Credits)

Selected major authors, works, themes, and/or genres from the early Republic to the turn of the century. (Spring odd-numbered years).

EN 613. American Literature 1900 to 1945. (3 Credits)

Selected major authors, works, themes, and/or genres from the turn of the century to WWI. (Fall odd-numbered years).

EN 614. American Literature 1945 to Present. (3 Credits)

Selected major authors, works, themes, and/or genres from WWI to the present. (Spring even-numbered years).

EN 615W. Technical Writing. (3 Credits)

This course is an interactive study of the history, theory, and function of technical writing. Using a workshop setting, students will be introduced to the roles technical writers play within various organization. A variety of working technical writers will join the class throughout the semester as guest speakers. Students will complete several technical writing projects while working in groups and individually. Global and local technical writing issues will be the examined using case studies, and the ethics of technical writers will also be examined.

EN 620. English Literature Before 1500. (3 Credits)

The political, social, and intellectual aspects of the Medieval period as reflected in the major literary works.

EN 621. English Literature: Renaissance to Restoration. (3 Credits)

The political, social and intellectual aspects of sixteenthand seventeenth-century England as reflected in the major literary works.

EN 622. Early Modern Drama Excluding Shakespeare. (3 Credits)

Selected major authors in Early Modern drama, excluding Shakespeare, from 1540 to 1800.

EN 623. Shakespeare. (3 Credits)

Intensive study of selected poetry and plays of William Shakespeare approached from a variety of perspectives, including but not limited to historical, theoretical, critical, or generic.

EN 625W. Document Design. (3 Credits)

This course is an intensive study of the rhetorical theory and research in document design. Attention will be given to both flat text documents and those in digital environments. The transfer of theory into practice is demonstrated through the practical application of design software. Successful team work and group work will be required.

EN 630. Jane Austen and the Romantic Novel. (3 Credits)

A study of the novels of Jane Austen and her contemporaries.

EN 631. English Literature: Restoration and Eighteenth Century. (3 Credits)

The political, social, and intellectual aspects of England from the Restoration to the publication of Lyrical Ballads, as reflected in major literary works.

EN 632. Romantic Poetry and Prose. (3 Credits)

An overview of Romanticism in English with readings from the expanding Romantic canon and an introduction to recent scholarship and disputes.

EN 633. Modern and Contemporary English Literature. (3 Credits)

Intensive study of major English writers since World War I.

EN 634. Victorian Poetry and Prose. (3 Credits)

Examination of Victorian novels, essays, and poems.

EN 635W. Publishing Practicum. (3 Credits)

This course allows writing students to experience the publishing process from beginning to end using a project/client as the basis for the course theme and focus. Projects will vary, but will range from both print to digital publishing. Students will build on skills acquired in other professional writing courses and couple those skills with the communication and management skills necessary to take a project from manuscript to print. (Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 641. English Linguistics. (3 Credits)

Analysis of contemporary American English: syntax, phonology, morphology. Traditional, structural, and transformational approaches.

EN 642. Cross-Linguistic Pragmatics. (3 Credits)

A study in the analysis of the similarities and differences in linguistic forms and patterns across diverse global cultures.

EN 645W. Seminar in Creative Writing. (3 Credits)

Workshop focusing on the student's major genre and signature style as well as training in the history and traditions associated with the genre and style, theoretical and formal approaches to creative craft, and intensive peer and faculty feedback, with opportunities to assist in the production of a literary magazine or writing series.

EN 653. Studies in the Novel. (3 Credits)

The novel as a literary genre approached from a variety of perspectives, including but not limited to generic, historical, theoretical, and single-author approaches. Course content varies.

EN 655. Literary Criticism. (3 Credits)

Major critical trends in literary theory, with emphasis on criticism since 1945, including structuralist, cultural materialist, deconstructive, and feminist approaches to literature. Exploration of these theories and analysis of selected works of literature. Required of students seeking a master's degree in English.

EN 656W. Seminar in Literary Editing and Publishing. (3 Credits)

Focused study of the role of literary editing in the industry; literary editing for the commercial and nonprofit press; revision of manuscripts; gallery proofs; queries; uses of blurbs and cover endorsements; forewords and acknowledgments; agents and contracts; the protocols of e-publishing, self-publishing, and print-on-demand books; protocols expected from the small press, print and online little magazines, the university press, and the post-avant press; introduction to InDesign. Each student will produce a press-ready complete chapbook of his/her own original work.

EN 660W. Writing Internship. (3 Credits)

This course provides the student with an opportunity to work as a professional writer and earn college credit under the direction of an English graduate faculty member.

EN 690. Thesis. (3,6 Credits)

Selection of a research problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of data, and composition of a defensible thesis. May be taken twice for three semester hours or once for six semester hours credit. Prerequisite: permission of the Director of Graduate Studies.

EN 691W. Selected Seminar in Writing. (3 Credits)

This course is a concentrated study in specific areas of writing.

EN 694W. Directed Final Project. (3 Credits)

In addition to course requirements, MA in Writing candidates must complete an independent research project under the direction of a member of the English graduate faculty. This project should serve in some significant way as a culminating experience of the MA in Writing program.

EN 695. Thesis Defense. (0 Credits)

Orientation to and administration of a thesis defense for the MA in English program. A non-credit course required of all candidates for the thesis option. The course is to be taken in the last term in which the student is expected to complete all other program requirements. A grade of "S" indicating satisfactory performance or a grade of "U" for unsatisfactory performance will be recorded on the transcript. A grade of "S" is required for graduation; the course may be repeated once. Prerequisite: student must have completed all other program requirements or be enrolled in the last course for program completion.

EN 696. Comprehensive Examination. (0 Credits)

Orientation to and admininstration of a written comprehensive examination for the M.A. in English program. A noncredit course required of all candidates for the non-thesis option. The course is taken the term in which the student expects to complete all other program requirements, or the term immediately thereafter. A grade of ¿S¿ indicating satisfactory performance or a grade of ¿U¿ for unsatisfactory will be recorded on the transcript. A grade of ¿S¿ is required for graduation; the course may be repeated once. Prerequisite: student must have completed all other program requirements or be enrolled in the last course(s) for program completion. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 697. Independent Study. (3 Credits)

Independent study or research under departmental determination, supervision, and evaluation. A student may take no more than two independent study courses. Prerequisite: permission of the chair of the department.

EN 698. Selected Topics in Literature. (3 Credits)

Study in a specific author, genre, or time period. Focus may be English literature, American literature, literature of the western world, or other areas of world literature.

EN 699. Directed Readings and Research. (3 Credits)

Individually supervised reading and research in a literary period. Prerequisite: permission of the Director of Graduate Studies.

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